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lolita 2

Youth Turn was originally written in 1996 and was revised in 2016.  It will appear here in a series of five or possibly six installments but it is a standalone short story. It is copyrighted. The copyright page will appear on each installment and is reprinted here. The story  is presented for your entertainment, and I do hope you enjoy it.

Peter

Youth Turn

Copyright © 1996; 2018 by Peter Weiss

All rights reserved.

This is a work of fiction. The names, characters, places and incidents are products of the writer’s imagination or have been used fictitiously and are not to be construed as real. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, actual events, locales or organizations is entirely coincidental.

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quill-pen-300x300So I’m going to take a little break here for the weekend. I’d like to thank all of you for following the blog. Pass it on to your friends and have them pass it on to their friends.

Have a great Labor Day weekend.

Bill Wynn and more next week.

Take care.

Peter

Books by Peter Weiss.


quill-pen-300x300So, due to a change in Facebook policy, the posts I’ve been posting after August 1st have not appeared on my page. It’s not an easy fix and is a work in progress. However, I’ve created a new face book page called Writer’s Play and posts should begin to appear there.

The actual link is:

link to Writer’s Play Facebook page

I’ve posted three of the missed Bill Wynn Fiction Outtakes that were not published there a few moments ago and will catch up. Meanwhile, in a bit, I’ll post the new one in the series.

Thanks for your patience, and thanks for following.

You can always get my published works here:

Books by Peter Weiss.


To All My Friends and Followers:

I’m taking a short vacation and will be away from posting here for about a week. Bill Wynn will return then.

Thanks to all of you who read the blog. Please feel free to reach out to me at

peterweisscreations@gmail.com

Until then…

Now Available On Amazon

Bill Wynn: The First Hundred

BW 1st 100 cover 2

Almost expelled from Ohio State University for being in the wrong place at the wrong time, Bill Wynn accepts a plea deal to ensure graduation. But having a police record prohibits him from utilizing his degree in the professional world.

Robert Moman, the broiler cook at one of the local steakhouses, is busted for running numbers. Sweeping out the City Hall Annex while on his work detail, Bill recognizes the workhouse blues. There to visit his probation officer, Bill’s soft heart and empathy cause them to meet.

Neither of their lives will ever be the same.

Pick up a copy of all my published works here: 

Books by Peter Weiss.


Bill Wynn: The First Hundred

BW 1st 100 cover 2

Almost expelled from Ohio State University for being in the wrong place at the wrong time, Bill Wynn accepts a plea deal to ensure graduation. But having a police record prohibits him from utilizing his degree in the professional world.

Robert Moman, the broiler cook at one of the local steakhouses, is busted for running numbers. Sweeping out the City Hall Annex while on his work detail, Bill recognizes the workhouse blues. There to visit his probation officer, Bill’s soft heart and empathy cause them to meet.

Neither of their lives will ever be the same.

Pick up a copy of all my published works here: 

Books by Peter Weiss.


kitchen-4

It snowed. And it snowed. And it snowed some more. Bill did trip and it didn’t matter. They were so s!ow Bill and Marie could have both disappeared from the kitchen and not have been missed for long periods of time. Only two waitresses worked, the two who lived closest to the restaurant. Bill was too blitzed for most of the evening to worry about how he was getting home. Mary, Bea and Henry Lee left as soon as Jimmy got in. The west side did not bother to come for steaks and decided they would simply use up whatever they already had.

Winter. But then, by the weekend, the streets and highways were cleared. The city settled into its usual harsh winter pattern of bitter cold with brisk winds and an overall sense of barrenness that didn’t seem to pervade other cities in winter. Or, as Bill thought about it, the city had all of the bad parts of winter with just about none of the good parts.

Ohio State did play three straight home games, Thursday night, Friday night and Saturday afternoon. Not that Bill particularly cared, but they won all three and were having a good season thus far. Their having a good season meant good crowds at the games. Thursday and Friday saw early dinner rushes before the games and a late push afterward. Saturday was a gangbuster day. They got busy after the game cleared out and they stayed busy all night.

Bill was doing his best to keep Bea at bay, but she was getting antsy. Being busy was a blessing since no one had time to really fool around. Even Bill and Mary were all about business. Henry Lee and Marie were too.

On Saturday, when Alfrieda came with the van to pick up meat for the west side, she was perky and pesky. She bothered Bill every chance she could get. That was whenever Henry Lee was not around, like when she was behind Bill going up the stairs while he was carrying meat trays. Then, when they were on the van and he was stacking the trays he’d carried, she felt him up shamelessly. He repeatedly told her to cut the crap, but the more he said something, the more brazen she was.

All the waitresses worked Saturday night. The poor business days they’d had on the snow nights were quickly forgotten and the university basketball crowds more than compensated for the slow nights. Everyone worked hard and everyone was about business. Even when it slowed down late Saturday night, everyone was too tired to mess around. The waitresses ordered their dinners and quietly sat to eat. The cooks rested in the hall. Marie sat on Bea’s stool and read the paper.

Lorraine came in around eleven with a beer for Bill. He had not gotten high at all and he had not had any bourbon. When he knew they were going to be really busy,  he played it straight for the most part. It was bad enough when they fell behind. It was worse when it was because he was messed up. Bill didn’t ever want to give Drenovis a reason to get on his case. If Drenovis wanted to start stuff, Bill wanted to be sure he could give it back and was not in any way vulnerable.

So mostly the weekend, beginning with Thursday that week, was all business. It was fast-paced, even hectic. At times it was frenetic. Bill and all the cooks earned their pay and then some. The waitresses made out like bandits. The dishwashers ate steaks and had unlimited sodas. Bill made sure they were well taken of and had everything they needed. Jim complained again, several times, about not having a beer when he saw Bill drinking one.

“Really think you’re something,” he said to Bill. Jim was more agitated than usual and  once again Bill sensed something was festering.

On Amazon In Just A Few Short Days

BW 1st 100 cover 2

Please do pick up a copy of my already published works here: 

Books by Peter Weiss.


kitchen-4

“What do you have to do for the afternoon?” Bill asked Mary. He stood close by her by the screen door, close enough so that she could feel him against her. He felt her shift on her feet so they were not touching.

“Nothing too much,” Mary said. “I got enough of just about everything until tomorrow and I’d rather start fresh tomorrow when we have more business. This way you can throw away a lot of the leftovers tonight without wasting much.”

“Think we have enough prime rib?” Bill asked.

“I think we should use up what’s there. If we run out, we run out and that’s best.”

“Henry Lee and I don’t even have much meat to cut,” Bill said. He leaned in close to Mary and whispered in her ear. “I think I’m gonna trip.”

“I think you are tripping,” said Mary. “And don’t be coming around rubbing all over me, either.”

“What you  mad at?”

“What was you and Bea doing in the store room?”

“She was getting salad dressing. I was rotating stock that should have been rotated and re-stacking what I had to move to get to it.”

“Yeah, I bet.”

“Well you can bet on it.”

“The bitch.”

“It’s not her I like.”

“But you still hit it, don’t you?”

“It’s easier than not. Turning her away is gonna make a fight I don’t need to fight in here right now. Give me a little time to  put her off.”

“You would do that?”

“Of course. You’re the only one I care about. You know what I mean. I care about Lorraine, but that’s different. She’s different.”

“Why you care about me?” Mary asked.

“If you have to ask, you really are stupid,” said Bill. “And I know you’re not stupid.”

The snow started to fall again as the lunch was ending. The lunch was abysmal and Tommy was clearly unhappy. He came to the table where Bea, Henry Lee, Mary and Bill were eating. His first question was quite simple, about how much food they had left over. Mary looked down into her plate when she told them they hadn’t sold much of anything. The steamship round, she told him, would be enough for the next day so that they didn’t have to cook another one. The lunch special was hardly touched. She was thinking about what she could make it into for a special for the dinner.

Henry Lee reported that they hadn’t sold many steaks either. He said he didn’t have to cut much for the evening and that he would talk to Robert about what they needed over on the west side. He said he couldn’t imagine they needed much over there.  He said he didn’t want to get too far ahead in the inventory, but that they could probably make up some of the lost business over the weekend when Ohio State was playing basketball at home. That of course would depend upon whether or not it snowed anymore.

Bill, as usual, ate very rare roast beef with lettuce, tomato, pickle and mayonnaise on a hamburger bun. Mary and Bea ate tuna fish salad sandwiches. Henry Lee ate a steak. Like any good meat cutter, he would make sure to get an extra steak out of one of the top butts to make up for the one he was eating. Here, at Suburban, the cooks really looked out for the owner. Altogether, this was a small operation, two stores, and the kitchen crews were pretty much interrelated. They knew as a unit that their livelihoods depended upon the success of the restaurants. None of them wanted to lose their jobs. They might complain about how hard they worked, how little they were paid and what a pain in the ass Drenovis was. But despite the snow, life was good.

On Amazon In A Few Short Days 

BW 1st 100 cover 2

Please do pick up a copy of my already published works here: 

Books by Peter Weiss.