Fun with words and words for fun

Category Archives: New Fiction

Copyright © 1996; 2018 by Peter Weiss

All rights reserved.

This is a work of fiction. The names, characters, places and incidents are products of the writer’s imagination or have been used fictitiously and are not to be construed as real. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, actual events, locales or organizations is entirely coincidental.

lolita 2The car pulled up behind the car before it and stopped in the morning rush hour traffic. Other cars immediately lined up and the two lanes waiting for the approach to the bridge sat still.

The man behind the wheel stroked his mustache. He was bald-headed, about fifty.   For All Those Years played on his car stereo. Hearing the song and the voice, tears welled up in his eyes. Traffic rolled slightly, a little ahead, but his car sat still.

Though the morning was cloudless, he’d lost sight of the traffic, of where he was. He hesitated, then he opened the car door and stepped out. Immediately horns from the cars behind his blasted, but hypnotized, he left the car door open and headed to the tree-filled embankment. There, he drew a Smith & Wesson from inside his belt, chambered a bullet and blew off the top of his head.

The shot was unmistakable to those stuck in traffic, a single pop like the slap of a hammer against a board. Some people recalled a  movie or a book. Others heard the rustle of the underbrush as the body fell. Everyone knew they would be late for work.

Melina rolled her skirt at the waist then opened the top two buttons of her blouse so you could see cleavage. Next, she took a lipstick from her school bag and with several deft strokes left a slick, smooth coat of red on her lips. She pressed her lips together, tossed the lipstick back in her bag and waited for the bus.

She found a window seat and took out her iPod. Eyes closed, she listened to Come to My Window. A breeze swirled from the window through the open blouse and over her breasts. She pictured one of her pop star idols and she felt creamy down there. She crossed her legs and squeezed tight.

She kept the iPod on as she crossed the Bruckner overpass toward school. The breeze stiffened her nipples so they pressed through her bra against her blouse. If her mother saw her now… But her mother was on her way to work in Manhattan, and her father too, and she was on her way to the prissy all-girls high school, where, before she could enter, she’d roll down her skirt and wipe off the lipstick. If she didn’t, she’d get detention and the Sisters would call home. Fuck that.

Public high school kids passed her in the opposite direction. She recognized some faces, boys and girls who passed her daily. The boys who stared at her breasts she gave the finger or blew kisses. The girls she sucked her lips at. “Ooh, baby,” she said once or twice. Already a black belt in karate, she waited for the pathetic being that might challenge her.

Pick up a copy of my published works here: 

Books by Peter Weiss.

Advertisements

ferris wheel

The Ferris Wheel

Peter A. Weiss

Copyright © 2017 by Peter Weiss

All rights reserved.

This is a work of fiction. The names, characters, places and incidents are products of the writer’s imagination or have been used fictitiously and are not to be construed as real. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, actual events, locales or organizations is entirely coincidental.

(11th and final installment)

So it was anticlimactic. His alarm went off at seven but Lilly was already up. She’d set her alarm for six-thirty. She stood over him, naked, clad only in his football jacket.

“I’m famished,” she said. “Let’s grab a shower and get something to eat. My treat.”

“Okay.” Paul stood up, kissed her, spread the jacket so he could look at her. Lilly stood there for him, unshy, smiling and flashing her dimples. She let the jacket fall away and turned fully around as if she were a model.

“Now you,” she said.

Paul dropped his skivvies and stood before her. The second she touched him, he sprayed her. Realizing what was happening, she helped him along and laughed a deep belly laugh. “Damn,” she said. She kissed him and kissed him, then she led him to the bathroom where they brushed their teeth, both using his toothbrush.

“Couldn’t help it,” he said. “Sorry.”

“You don’t have to be sorry with me, Paul. Don’t ever be sorry.”

In the shower, she taught him everything she liked so that after she’d caught up to him, and not before, she helped him strip away his innocence.

“Wasn’t quite what I expected,” he said while he was drying her back.

“Or me.”

“What’d you expect?”

“Probably what you did, a nice long… You know. Plenty of foreplay then plenty of horseback riding.”

“Well, what are we going to do about it?”

“We still have three nights. I’ll give you a pass and you can hang out with me. When it gets late, you can go home and I’ll meet you here.”

“Sounds like a plan.”

“If you fall asleep, I’m waking you up.”

“Deal.”

All dried, they stood naked before each other. They hugged and kissed. Then Lilly saw the clock and knew she had to go.

“You know, if I just worked there, I’d blow off the whole three days. It’s different when you own the business.”

“I suppose it is,” said Paul. “I’m just a working class kid, so I wouldn’t know about owning a business.”

“I won’t even be late,” said Lilly. “I have to set the example.” She started for the living room where she’d slept. “Get dressed and follow me in your car. When we get there, I’ll fix you up with a pass, do a couple of things in the office and then we can get something to eat.”

Paul grabbed her arm and pulled her to him. He kissed like he’d never kissed anyone and he held her so tight she was breathless.

“Lilly…,” he started. But she put a finger to his lips to stop him.

“We roll out of here Tuesday morning. I may never see you again. So don’t do anything but enjoy the time we have.”

“I was just gonna tell you I’m not a big star. I’m just a pretty good linebacker and a very regular guy.”

“Never sell yourself short, honey.” Lilly stepped into her panties, put on her bra and quickly finished dressing. Paul hurried so she wouldn’t be late.

The End

Pick up a copy of my published works here: Books by Peter Weiss.


ferris wheel

The Ferris Wheel

Peter A. Weiss

Copyright © 2017 by Peter Weiss

All rights reserved.

This is a work of fiction. The names, characters, places and incidents are products of the writer’s imagination or have been used fictitiously and are not to be construed as real. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, actual events, locales or organizations is entirely coincidental.

(10th Installment)

Then their time was up. Lilly looked at her watch and told Paul they’d be getting off shortly. Only then did she take his hand, ever so briefly, under her skirt and under her panties. Just for a moment, she led his fingers into her most private space. After she let go his hand, she unzipped his fly and helped herself to a feel of him. Then she zipped him back up and kissed him one last time.

They walked slowly, hand in hand back to one of the ticket booths.

“I like you, Paul. I liked the way you looked last year and I like that you’re just you.”

“I like you too, Lilly.”

“I’m on the pill,” she said. “You can go bareback if you’re not sick. And just so you know, I’ve never let anyone bareback ever. You’ll be the first and the only.”

“How could I be sick, Lilly? I haven’t been anywhere.”

“Good,” Lilly said. “I don’t get any more breaks. I’ll be done about two in the morning. I have to be back at nine. The next three days, like today, are crazy for us. Anyway, meet me here, at this ticket booth.”

“I’m gonna find a good place to take a snooze” said Paul.

“Don’t be late, honey.” Lilly gave him a kiss on the cheek and disappeared into the booth.

4

The jeep was yellow sunshine. Lilly drove fast and wild with her cowboy hat off so her hair could fly in the wind. At the first traffic light, she kissed Paul and took his hand to kiss too. They were far apart in the bucket seats, the gearshift in between them, so that was it until they reached Paul’s apartment. She let Paul lead the way up the outside stairs, inside to the elevator and up to the fourth floor. Then they were in his apartment where she plopped herself down on the sofa.

“I am so beat,” she said. “I could just crash right here. But we had a good day. Took in plenty of money. Course that don’t mean we made a lot. But we did okay. This is always a good fair for us, I mean when the weather is nice.”

“Want a soda?”

“Got a beer?”

“How about some white wine? I don’t drink, but I do have a bottle someone gave me that’s been chilling.”

“Sure.”

Paul went to the kitchen. When he returned, Lilly had kicked off her boots and taken off her socks. She had lain down on the sofa and fallen asleep.

He stood a long while looking at her, her feet mostly because she had gorgeous feet, he thought. He didn’t know what they were going to be like, but he’d imagined they’d be like—he didn’t know—cowgirl feet, whatever that was. He imagined chubby toes, calluses and maybe not manicured. But they were slender feet with painted toenails, a French pedicure with gold tips. Looking at them gave him wild thoughts and the wild thoughts made him very, very ready. He’d been ready for many years, many, many years.

Every part of him wanted to wake her. Every part of him wanted to use her as she lay there. Every part of him just wanted her and wanted to be done with the silly virginity thing. He went to his bed and took off one of the covers. Gently, so she wouldn’t feel it, he covered her and went off to sleep. Before he fell off, he remembered she said she had to be back at nine, so he set his phone to wake him at seven. It wasn’t the first time he’d gone to bed horny. It was just another in a long string of times. Goddamn, he thought, disappointed.

to be continued

Pick up a copy of my published works here: Books by Peter Weiss.


ferris wheel

The Ferris Wheel

Peter A. Weiss

Copyright © 2017 by Peter Weiss

All rights reserved.

This is a work of fiction. The names, characters, places and incidents are products of the writer’s imagination or have been used fictitiously and are not to be construed as real. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, actual events, locales or organizations is entirely coincidental.

(9th Installment)

“So I got to thinking and I was thinking how you were so sweet and honest last year. And I thought how wouldn’t it be nice if we met up again and I had as much desire as you, you know? So…so…”

She paused for effect and looked at Paul. “So…just so you know, I haven’t been with anyone since we met and I haven’t done anything with myself for about two months. Crazy, huh?”

“Not at all. I’m totally flattered.” Paul flashed her a big smile, pulled her tighter to him and squeezed her hand.

“Your turn. But don’t say anything stupid. I bet you’ve been having lots of girls now that you’re a big football star.”

“Actually,” said Paul, “it’s easy to get girls now and I…Aw, what the hell, Lilly. I decided I would wait for you, to see if we met up again. I thought it would be really special if I gave you my first time.”

“You’re kidding me.”

“Not at all.”

“What makes you think we’re gonna, you know?” Lilly made a little face and nudged him to indicate what she was talking about.

“Well, I was hoping. It’s something I wanted. Of course it’s all up to you.”

“You really are a silly little boy,” said Lilly. “You have a place to take me, I mean if we decide to? I’m not going back there in the hay.”

“That’s where my friends went last year.”

“First off, I wouldn’t call them friends. Then I’m just dying to know what they told you.”

“Not much. Only that they got laid back there in the hay.”

“They said that, huh?”

“Yup.”

“Well, maybe they did and maybe they didn’t.”

“What do you mean?”

“What I said. I see everything here, and what I can’t see, my people see.”

“They said they were sorry it didn’t work out for me.”

Lilly leaned in and kissed Paul. As she did so, she took his hand to hold in both of hers. “You’re precious,” she said. “Maybe they were sorry it didn’t work out for them.” She kissed him more, and more, each time deeper and fuller. “Do you have a place to take me? Cause it’s gonna work out for you.”

“My place. It’s a small college apartment but it has a comfortable bed and it’s private. I didn’t drive here. My friend Alan did. So I don’t have my car.”

“I have a jeep,” said Lilly. “It’s open and fun.” Again she unleashed a long, intimate kissing session. This one lasted nearly the entire time they were on the ride. While they kissed, the Ferris wheel spun. It started, stopped, did its thing. People got on and off, the noise got softer and louder. At the times they were stopped up top, they took a moment to look out over the fair, to take in the lights, the other rides, the people.

The first time they were stopped up there after they’d decided where they were going later, Lilly led Paul’s hand over her body. Paul remained passive, allowing her to show him the way. Lilly seemed content with this, even relieved maybe. Paul wanted to be considerate, to be patient. Once the decision was made, there was no hurry, he thought. Besides, he didn’t understand the circumstances Lilly had to contend with, the rules she had to obey. After all, she was at work.

to be continued

Pick up a copy of my published works here: Books by Peter Weiss.


 

ferris wheel

The Ferris Wheel

Peter A. Weiss

Copyright © 2017 by Peter Weiss

All rights reserved.

This is a work of fiction. The names, characters, places and incidents are products of the writer’s imagination or have been used fictitiously and are not to be construed as real. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, actual events, locales or organizations is entirely coincidental.

(8th Installment)

Like last year, they waited on line. Unlike last year, Paul knew they didn’t have to. “This gives you a chance to explain why you weren’t here last night, why you left me to think I might never see you again.”

“I had an early football practice this morning.”

“And?”

“Well, this is big-league ball, Lilly. Last year, after we said bye, I had no plans to play. I didn’t get a scholarship or even apply for one. But then I saw a sign over at the athletic field saying they accepted walk-ons and it listed the dates and times. So I decided to try out. Don’t ask me why except it popped into my head and I went with it.

“I made the cut. Then I had to lose weight, gain speed and muscle and get myself back into prime shape. Took me six weeks, but I beat out one of the starting linebackers and had a pretty decent season.

“This year, I did great in camp. I did great in the scrimmages and pre-season games. The way the schedule worked out, we were lucky and got the weekend off, but the coach worked us really hard this morning. Actually we worked all day. No way I was going out last night knowing we were working out hard today.”

“And the point is…”

“I couldn’t risk messing up the practice.”

Lilly laughed. She let go Paul’s hand as the line moved forward. “Put your arm around me, Paul. You mean you couldn’t even come to see if I was here?”

“Honestly? I was afraid if I saw you I wouldn’t be able to drag myself away.”

“So playing ball is more important than me?”

“Well, yes and no.”

“What kind of answer is that?”

“An honest one.”

“Explain.”

“When we’re up there,” Paul said pointing to the top of the Ferris wheel. He drew her face close to his and kissed her. Lilly kissed back and their tongues said hello. “Damn I missed you. I thought about you. I dreamed about you lots of times.”

“I wondered about you,” said Lilly. “I dreamt about you, but not lots of times.”

“You pick up any guys?”

“You want the truth?”

“For sure.”

“When we’re up there,” she said.

Like last year, when it was their turn, Lilly stepped off to talk to the operator. Then the Ferris wheel turned a bit, until the number nineteen carriage came down and the people in it got out. Paul and Lilly stepped in and sat down.

“We’ll be on for awhile,” said Lilly.

“Good.” Paul put his arm around her but didn’t kiss her until they were quarter way up. Lilly kissed back, hard. She took Paul’s free hand in hers in her lap.

“So start talking.”

“You first.”

“Choose you.”

“Deal. Rock, paper, scissors.”

Paul won. “Well? You pick up any other guys?”

“A year’s a long time,” said Lilly. “A girl gets lonely. Specially one like me on the road all the time. I had plenty of chances you know. And I’m not getting any younger either. I turned twenty-one. That’s a damn big day.”

“And?”

to be continued

Pick up a copy of my published works here: Books by Peter Weiss.


ferris wheel

The Ferris Wheel

Peter A. Weiss

Copyright © 2017 by Peter Weiss

All rights reserved.

This is a work of fiction. The names, characters, places and incidents are products of the writer’s imagination or have been used fictitiously and are not to be construed as real. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, actual events, locales or organizations is entirely coincidental.

(7th Installment)

“I’m so glad you found me.”

“I didn’t know if you’d be here. You weren’t here last night. We opened yesterday.”

“Yeah,” said Paul. “I couldn’t make it last night.”

“Heavy date?”

“With my eyelids.”

“Whoa. Didn’t see me in a year and didn’t come to see if you could find me the first night? I’m really hurt.”

“I can explain.”

“Well it will take a lot of explaining, mister.”

“Let’s get something to eat.”

“I only got twenty minutes. I get an hour at ten.”

“What time you get off?”

“Let’s not get ahead of ourselves,” said Lilly. “The BBQ is super. C’mon. I’ll show you where to eat.”

They walked hand in hand, Lilly staying close by him and leading him to one of the BBQ stands. They didn’t talk until they were seated under the big canopy under which was a boatload of picnic tables where the people could sit and eat. She sat next to him, flush against him.

“You grew your hair.”

“I did.”

“You lost weight too.”

“Yeah, but I put on muscle. You’re wearing a skirt and makeup.”

“Am I pretty?”

“You need me to tell you?”

“I want to hear you say it if you think so. But remember, no lies, no BS. We only have the time we have, and I gotta go in ten minutes.”

“You’re gorgeous, Lilly. I could eat you all up.”

“Just eat your BBQ, big boy.”

They laughed and they leaned against each other as they ate. Then it was time for her to go. She didn’t hesitate or dawdle. She insisted Paul walk her to the booth where she had to report.

“Ten o’clock, sharp, right here,” Lilly said. “Don’t you be late. And if I am, you wait here for me.”

Paul went to kiss her bye but she stopped him. “Not here,” she said as she walked off to the side door of the booth.

3

Elliot and the three musketeers came by where they’d said they’d meet at nine-thirty. They weren’t alone, and of course they didn’t bring a girl for Paul. The girls introduced themselves, not that it mattered, but interestingly one of the girls said she knew him, that he was in her lit class. She told her friends that he played for the college team, and she fawned over him till Steve, who she was with, pulled her to him and said they were heading off to go on some rides. As a courtesy, they asked Paul if he wanted to join them. Paul told the truth, that he was tired and was gonna sit awhile before he went home. “Long, long day,” he said. “Anyway, have a great night. Guess I’ll see you in class on Tuesday.”

Thank you God, Paul internalized as he watched them head away. Considering everything, it couldn’t have gone any better. He wasn’t angry, upset or resentful that his friends had taken care of themselves and not him, as they always did. He was happy and content. Happy and content, he sat and listened to the music till it was time to walk over to the booth.

Lilly was several minutes late. Paul watched her as she walked up to him, noted that she had eight ride tickets in her hand. “I thought we’d go on number nineteen on the Ferris wheel,” she said. “Okay with you?”

Paul smiled and took her hand.

to be continued

Pick up a copy of my published works here: Books by Peter Weiss.


ferris wheel

The Ferris Wheel

Peter A. Weiss

Copyright © 2017 by Peter Weiss

All rights reserved.

This is a work of fiction. The names, characters, places and incidents are products of the writer’s imagination or have been used fictitiously and are not to be construed as real. Any resemblance to persons, living or dead, actual events, locales or organizations is entirely coincidental.

(6th Installment)

They were supposed to meet up at nine-thirty. By then the bands would be in full swing, one set after the next until the early morning hours. Paul sat a long time by himself. He didn’t want to move around because he was tired. His team had had a heavy workout in full equipment through the whole morning and into the early afternoon. The coach worked them hard with three days off upcoming, so they had a full scrimmage after the regular drills.

Biggest rule for the defense was not to hurt the running backs and receivers and never to take down the quarterback. Paul had found multiple clean shots at all of those protected species, and once, in an awkward moment turned funny, he was almost unable to stop himself from whapping the QB. At the last minute, uncharacteristically, he had opened his arms and smothered him in a bear hug. The coach caught it on film, and in the afternoon they showed the film. Paul hugged him, said something to him which could not be heard, then he took off his helmet and kissed the QB on his. He and the QB had had a big laugh and a Kodak moment. The offensive lineman and the running back had been sentenced to ten laps for missing their blocks. The coach asked Paul what he’d said but Paul told him he didn’t kiss and tell.

He remembered. He remembered what he said. He remembered what he said to the offensive lineman who missed the block. He remembered that the next play, he smacked that lineman with a forearm and told him he’d better never leave the QB naked like that again. If it had been a game, that QB would have been out for the count. The lineman said something nasty back to Paul, so Paul decided to put him on his ass, which he did two plays later, flat back and down on his butt. That cost the lineman another ten laps and so at the end of the practice the lineman did twenty laps, five miles, and the running back did ten laps. Paul ran the whole five miles with the lineman, something he did for the team because bad blood had no place on the team, in season or off, and though there was always bad blood, Paul was damned if he’d be the cause of it.

So he was tired. He had shaved and showered after practice and taken a quick nap at home before meeting up with Elliot and the musketeers. He sat quietly now and stayed within himself. He was hungry and didn’t even get up to get something to eat. In fact, despite the noise and the music and the lights and the tumult, he was almost dozing off.

“Did you see me in your dreams?” Lilly nudged Paul with her arm. She stood by him looking down at him where he sat.

Paul looked up at her, noticed she wore a skirt and blouse. She still had cowboy boots and her cowboy hat on, but he saw she was wearing lipstick.

“Hey,” he said. He scooched over a bit so she could sit with him. He smiled at her and reached out to shake hands.

“Well, did you?”

“What?”

“See me in your dreams.”

“Lots of times,” he said. “Lots of times. You see me?”

“I did.” Lilly shook his hand and kept it in hers. Then she leaned in toward him and kissed him once, a hello kiss. “Goddamn you look good. I almost didn’t recognize you.”

to be continued

Pick up a copy of my published works here: Books by Peter Weiss.